[NSFW] Consistency and Redundancy: The Gamer’s Struggle with a Need and a Fear of Change

[NSFW] Consistency and Redundancy: The Gamer’s Struggle with a Need and a Fear of Change

There’s an ancient Internet proverb that goes something like… well let’s just look at it in its original text.

zelda-unsatisfiable-fans

Despite lacking a bit of tact or class, the general idea of the above post highlights an interesting point. Do gamers crave change and novelty, or will it always be met with frustration and the adoration of the previous status-quo?

Given the success of Wind Waker HD, a glorified port of one of the games oh-so-eloquently mentioned above, which caused a 685% increase in UK Wii U sales, among other achievments, it’s hard to argue that the consumers of the gaming industry really crave nuances in their favorite franchises as much as they claim sometimes. But just because a redux of an old game does well, that doesn’t mean that different games can’t do well as a result, right?

Sonic Chronicles Cover

Sonic Chronicles: The Dark Brotherhood is a Sonic the Hedgehog RPG. Now, it seems a little odd, but it is definitely and unabashedly different from the rest of the Sonic series. And you know what? It does a pretty decent job of creating a game in an entirely different genre. Turns out, all those characters that have been cropping up over the years, to the bemoaning of some fans, really have a chance to shine during the slower pace of an RPG story than that of a platformer. The combat isn’t so bad either, but in the end the game was just overlooked as a weird little excursion, and the sequel they planned for never came to pass. New concept, but no one went for it.

Or, how about Banjo-Kazooie: Nuts and Bolts? People were clamoring for any resurrection of the Banjo series after the sequel, yet threw a fit when the game finally came out. Instead of rejoicing that their beloved IP had come out with a new game, many fans said that it wasn’t the game they wanted, what with it being about driving cars and everything. And fair enough, expectations are a good thing to meet, but the the particular level of outrage at this different Banjo-Kazooie is probably what has kept any more games from coming out to this day.

250px-SuperMarioGalaxySuper_Mario_Galaxy_2_Box_Art

And, let’s not forget the other side of the spectrum. Remember Super Mario Galaxy 2, otherwise known as an expansion pack for Super Mario Galaxy? Don’t get me wrong, I love both games. However, I find it a little odd that everyone was OK with Galaxy 2 being nearly the exact same game, whereas New Super Mario Bros. Wii was condemned for being to similar to its DS counterpart, despite the fact that NSMBWii had incorporated four-person multiplayer into a platformer, which certainly wasn’t the norm at the time.

Yoshi's New Island Cover

What’s got me all up in a huff about this recently is the release and reception of Yoshi’s New Island, a 3DS game which seems to get panned because it’s “the same as the original“. But this is that same original that has been almost universally adored by fans both old and new (and personally, my favorite game of all time). Yet, this hasn’t been some sort of wistful, ” I like all the things they kept that were good, just add new stuff too”. This was counting against the game for not being different enough from the title that was so successful before. Given some of the examples I’ve shown here, I’d be willing to bet there would be just as many people complaining about what was changed and how they shouldn’t have strayed from the original, had they changed anything.

In my opinion, there really needs to be a consensus on this as gamers. Either we take the risks with our wallets to try a game that’s outside of our comfort zone, whether it be a new spin on a franchise or something completely different, or we allow ourselves to admit that often times we like what was done before better than anything new that can be thrown at us.

Or, you could just buy the new Mario game every year then complain about how it was the same as the last five.


Article rating: 7.00 BEARDS out of 10

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